Posted by: Rabideye | August 24, 2009

Let’s get artsied up! 50-Mile Haiku Project: Submit your own, as a comment …

Squashku

Squashku

Haiku info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiku

Haiku (俳句, haikai verse?) Haiku.ogg listen (help·info), plural haiku, is a form of Japanese poetry, consisting of 17 moras (or on), in three metrical phrases of 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively.[1] Haiku typically contain a kigo, or seasonal reference, and a kireji or verbal caesura.

In Japanese, haiku are traditionally printed in a single vertical line, while haiku in English usually appear in three lines, two parallel the three metrical phrases of Japanese haiku.[2] Previously called hokku, haiku was given its current name by the Japanese writer Masaoka Shiki at the end of the 19th century.

So… 5 syllables in the first line,

7 in the second and

5 in the third:

a seasonal reference is required (but this can be quite subtle).

___

Late-Summer Squashku

“White orb, your tired

Blossom gapes powdery gold

The bees hover still”

-G. Spezzacatena

___

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Responses

  1. Garden has run riot.
    What to do with all of it?
    Does zucchini freeze?

  2. Why no local oats?
    Potatoes are no breakfast,
    Nor is zucchini.

  3. Oats? Not wheat you mean?
    Why not grow “The Staff of Life?”
    Breakfast toast is best.

  4. Sharon Deane asks me to post this on her behalf:

    I lay awake for far too long last night, thinking these up. Don’t every let anyone say I don’t have a life.

    Sharon

    A ripe golden plum
    Drips luscious rays down my arm –
    The sun embodied.

    My wheat is gathered.
    My labours are rewarded
    With one small muffin.

    Humble brown tuber
    Hides a fiery golden heart –
    I have grown ginger!

    Oh, do not hunger
    For fruits of the orient –
    We have blackberries!

    And if you don’t mind a bit more zucchini-bashing:

    One more zucchini.
    What shall we make with this one?
    Perhaps an anchor?

    The water is calm.
    I hold a fat zucchini.
    Let’s see if it skips.

    Well, that’s it for now. I’m sure there are more clamouring to get out.

    Sharon

  5. I can’t believe it,
    Sharon Deane has grown ginger.
    Can she show me how?

    • wow. a question in haiku form. what talents Powell River can boast! 🙂

  6. (Not a haiku)

    That last one of Sharon’s about skipping zucchinis across the water made me laugh out loud. I hope I’ve eaten the last of our zucchini for this year, but I won’t be sure unless I uproot the plants.

    Someone needs to breed ornamental zucchini!

  7. Another one from Sharon Deane, the poet laureate of local food:

    If one could survive
    On pigeons and blackberries,
    Life would be simple.

  8. Tomato leaves shrivel
    Too hot under plastic roof
    Roll up the sides!

    Sunflower heads swell
    Bending stems towards the ground
    Watch out for squirrels!

    We built four new steps
    From the deck to the garden
    No more climbing down

  9. Seed savers unite!
    Save for Seedy Saturday
    Soon… March Twenty Ten

  10. Good post – Im off to add you to my feed reader


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